Water, NACWA and the 2016 Election Cycle

It’s finally over. One of the most unique presidential elections in history.  It was the first election where both presidential candidates actually focused on infrastructure and used the word “water” multiple times in multiple speeches – a victory for our often-overlooked sector!  NACWA has always maintained that water is a uniquely bipartisan or non-partisan issue. […]

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Senate Comes Together on Water Infrastructure; Attention Turns to the House of Representatives

While Washington may have a well-deserved reputation for partisan gridlock, the U.S. Senate took a major step on September 15  towards showing that issues around water and water infrastructure can be overwhelming bipartisan when it passed S.2848, the Water Resources Development Act of 2016 (WRDA), with a thumping 95-3 vote. In an intense election season […]

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U.S. Deserves Gold Medal in Water Quality

When the Summer Olympics kick off on August 5, the world’s attention will be focused for two weeks on the Games and on the host city, Rio de Janeiro.  But instead of the international spotlight shining solely on the athletes and on the fabulous Brazilian culture enveloping the competition, scrutiny will also be turned to […]

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The Power of Video

Runoff is a tough concept to explain.  Erin Wilcox, Water Resource Specialist for NEW Water, was quick on the draw with her camera when she witnessed this Wisconsin springtime phenomenon in action.
“They say a picture tells 1,000 words, and I knew it was fortunate to see runoff happening so distinctly before my eyes,” she said.
Runoff […]

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Utilities Achieve Chesapeake Bay Nutrient Goals 10 Years Ahead of Schedule

Many folks believe that the greatest challenge to improving water quality is eliminating hypoxic zones, often termed “dead zones,” which are areas in lakes and oceans of such low oxygen concentration that aquatic life dies. These hypoxic zones are fueled by the presence of excessive amounts of nutrients – mainly phosphorus and nitrogen. The consequences […]

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Balancing the Need for Investment with Low-income Customer Affordability

As communities across the nation address the ever-pressing need to maintain and update its water infrastructure, a larger question looms, ‘How do sewer and water utilities make these much-needed investments while being mindful about affordability, particularly as it relates to low-income customers?’  In short, how do utilities balance the staggering need for investment vs. low-income […]

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From Conflict to Collaboration

Credit: Michael Hanson

By:  Staff, American Rivers
Editor’s note: NACWA is excited to welcome our first guest blog from the conservationist community. American Rivers has often been a strong partner of NACWA and our members, and this blog “cross-pollination” is an example of collaboration on a national level!
 
From Conflict to Collaboration
Topping American Rivers’ 2016 list of America’s […]

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Building 21st Century Infrastructure for 21st Century Cities

The creation of modern water and wastewater systems was one of the most significant public health achievements of the 20th century. Drinking water treatment and systems brought safe, reliable drinking water to homes and businesses. Clean water systems eliminated deadly diseases such as cholera and typhoid and helped extend life expectancy in the U.S. by […]

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Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District Advances One Water/Integrated Planning Approach to Address Phosphorus at Watershed Scale

Faced with increasingly stringent regulatory requirements and limited resources, utilities are less able to rely on strategies of the past. Forward-looking utilities are instead seeking innovative, holistic solutions to improve environmental outcomes at reduced cost. As a Utility of the Future, Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) is embracing a watershed-based approach as it advances a […]

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Des Moines Water Works Lawsuit Asks: Who Should Pay for Nutrient Pollution?

On March 16, 2015, Des Moines Water Works (“DMWW”) sued three drainage districts located in Sac County, Iowa (“the Districts”) seeking relief under the Clean Water Act (“CWA”), state environmental laws, and state common law, for discharging large amounts of nitrogen through drainage ditches into the Raccoon River. The Raccoon River is a key drinking […]

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