Monthly Archives: October 2013

The Farm Bill and the Fight to Reduce Nutrient Run-Off

Nutrient runoff is the greatest water quality challenge facing the United States today.  According to State water quality reports, 80,000 miles of rivers and streams, 2.5 million acres of lakes, reservoirs and ponds, 78% of the assessed continental U.S. coastal areas and more than 30% of estuaries are impaired due to excessive levels of nitrogen […]

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The Shutdown, Clean Water Agencies and the Need for Collaboration

The shutdown of the federal government got a lot more attention inside the beltway than it did in other cities and towns across our expansive country.  In D.C., we often live in a bubble, thinking that all eyes are fixed upon what policy-makers on Capitol Hill and in federal agencies  are doing. But regardless of […]

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Protecting our Pipes, Pumps, Plants, and Personnel

Earlier this month, NACWA notified its members that it was declaring war to protect our pipes, pumps, and plants by reducing the harmful materials that are flushed or drained into the sewer system.  These products include wipes, unused pharmaceuticals, paper towels, feminine hygiene products, dental floss, FOG (fats, oils, and greases), as well as product […]

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Cooperative Federalism: Courts Get it Right in Nutrient Litigation

In September, two federal court rulings reinforced NACWA’s long-held positions on cooperative federalism and EPA’s proper role in the total maximum daily load (TMDL) and water quality standard development process. Taken together, these two decisions paint a clear path forward for EPA to regulate nutrients in a holistic watershed manner that appropriately addresses nonpoint source […]

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I Know the Value of Water . . . Do You?

Most of us don’t give much thought to the role water plays in our daily lives – much less realize that the apple we snacked on this afternoon was the result of 19 gallons of water, or that glass of wine we enjoyed with dinner last night took a whopping 32 gallons of water to […]

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