Category Archives: Green Infrastructure

Water Quality Concerns Tops the List for USDA RCPP Spending and NACWA Members are Key Partners

Today, the USDA announced 115 grant awards under the Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP), a new program established under the 2014 Farm Bill that relies on non-agricultural partners to help farmers implement conservation practices to address natural resources concerns, including water quality.   The program is a novelty as it is the first USDA conservation program […]

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Leading Beyond the Plant with the Urban Waters Federal Partnership

Last week, NACWA partnered with 27 NGO’s and 14 Federal Agencies to support the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP). Groundwork USA, Wilderness Inquiry, and the Society of Municipal Arborists may seem to be unusual bedfellows, but NACWA shares the common belief that the best way to maintain and restore critical urban waters and watersheds is […]

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What a Difference a “Green” Year Makes

As we all know, a lot can happen in a year. 33 communities gathered this week in Cleveland for the second annual Green Infrastructure Summit. Green infrastructure (GI) has become such  a “regulator approved” approach to manage stormwater that it is hard to believe only one year ago, when a slightly smaller group of communities […]

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Sailing New Waters with Strangers

Recently, around our office, we have been discussing strangers.  Not the kind that you were taught about in grade school (remember those Stranger Danger posters?) – but people with different perspectives that we might learn from – and connect and collaborate with.  Collaboration has been a key tenet of NACWA for years, and reaching out […]

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Moving Beyond Gray vs. Green to Embrace “Sustainable Infrastructure”

A bioretention pond slowly releases stormwater runoff into an enlarged storm sewer.  An overflow drain system collects sheet flow from a bioswale to manage storms larger than the design event.  These are both examples of how green infrastructure utilizes and integrates traditional “gray” components, like conduits and drains, to function properly and efficiently.  On a […]

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Milwaukee’s Energy Independence Program Exemplifies the Utility of the Future Initiative

The Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) has been working toward energy independence since 2009.  The primary driver to this effort is the desire to stabilize and reduce the energy portion of our charges to our ratepayers.  Along with this, MMSD also wants to minimize our influence on climate change.
MMSD has established a goal of having […]

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Utility of The Future at Work: San Antonio Water System

Gregg Eckhardt is guest blogger to The Water Voice and a Senior Resource Analyst for San Antonio Water System.
Today, attendees at NACWA’s National Clean Water Law Seminar in San Antonio, Texas glimpsed the utility of the future in a luncheon address by Steve Clouse, Senior Vice-President and Chief Operating Officer of the San Antonio Water […]

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The Case for Green and the Need for Strong NGO Collaboration

Green infrastructure (GI) is entering a “make it or break it” phase; certain communities, with support from federal and state agencies, are now willing to invest broadly in GI, such as vegetated bioswales or green roofs, as a way to manage urban stormwater. These forward-thinking communities, many of whom see the challenge of wet weather […]

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NACWA/AMWA Report Analyzes the Critical Importance of Tax Exempt Municipal Bonds to the Water Sector

For more than a century, tax-exempt municipal bonds have been the most important source of funding for water and wastewater infrastructure projects in the United States. Since 2003, municipalities have issued $258 billion worth of tax-exempt municipal bonds to fund water and wastewater infrastructure – comprising approximately 16% of all municipal bond issuance for all […]

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Green Infrastructure: Have We Reached a Tipping Point?

Use of green infrastructure continues to grow in cities around the Nation.
Increasingly, communities are turning to green infrastructure to reduce or eliminate runoff by capturing stormwater where it falls rather than allowing it to enter sewer systems. The result is improved water quality, flood mitigation, reduced urban temperatures, decreased energy costs, and other aesthetic and […]

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