Tag Archives: integrated planning

White House Conference to Shine Spotlight on Green Infrastructure and Stormwater Management

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Next week, the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will hold a joint conference to examine the growing role of green infrastructure in managing urban stormwater runoff. The invitation-only event will draw key stakeholders from the utility, engineering, educational, environmental, and government communities to examine ways to more widely implement green infrastructure practices. [ … ]

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It’s Time for a New Approach to Financial Capability Assessments

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For the past decade, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has relied on an outdated approach to assessing the financial capability of communities to pay for Clean Water Act investments. Although EPA’s recently released Integrated Planning Framework provides a new way to evaluate and prioritize water-related investments to maximize water-quality improvement for each dollar invested, it relies on EPA’s outdated 1997 guidance on financial capability, Combined Sewer Overflows – Guidance for Financial Capability Assessment and Schedule Development. [ … ]

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Top Discussions: Integrated Planning, Social Media, Utility of the Future

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NACWA recently hosted its 2012 Summer Conference & 42nd Annual Meeting, Transformational Leadership. . . Changing the Game for the Next 40 Years of Clean Water, in Philadelphia. Although several topics emerged during the conference, three were discussed repeatedly. These include EPA’s Integrated Planning Framework, the need for utilities to get involved in social media, and the evolution of the clean water utility. [ … ]

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What is the Future of Stormwater Regulation?

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Last week, EPA announced a new schedule for its efforts to develop a revised national post-construction stormwater rule. This development has opened the door to continue an ongoing discussion about the future of stormwater regulation in the United States. Much has been written recently about changes in urban stormwater management occurring across the United States. This change is significant, moving from an old model of using impervious surface to run stormwater runoff into collection systems (and nearby waterbodies) as quickly as possible to a new focus on retaining stormwater onsite and slowing its flow into local waterways. The use of green infrastructure and low-impact development, as opposed to more traditional concrete and asphalt, is a key element of this innovative approach. But what is the impetus for this new stormwater management method, and what does it mean for municipal stormwater utilities?

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Where the Rubber Meets the Road … Implementing the Integrated Planning Framework

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It’s out! EPA’s final Integrated Municipal Stormwater and Wastewater Planning Approach Framework is now available. The much anticipated, briefly delayed final version of EPA’s Framework was signed June 5 and released to the public on June 12. The final framework, though only slightly changed from the January draft, includes expanded discussions on adaptive management and financial capability, which should provide additional clarity as utilities explore use of the framework.
Work to ensure that EPA’s framework succeeds, however, is just beginning. [ … ]

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The Real Value of Integrated Planning

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As the head of a clean water utility, one of the most regulated entities under the federal Clean Water Act, it may be difficult to imagine a world in which the utility, with input from the community it serves, gets to decide how and when to make investments in clean water. Addressing federal mandates will no doubt continue to consume much of the clean water community’s time and money in the near-term, but recent developments on the national level suggest that change may be coming to put more control in the hands of the utility. [ … ]

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